Common Segments (With Examples)

In this article, we will run through explanations of common segments used, along with their examples across segments for:

  • Specific Pages
  • User Click Behaviours
  • Loaded Content, or Dynamic Content/Pop-ups
  • Funnel Stage Abandonment
  • Source/Medium/Campaign
  • Viewed Content (based on scrolling)
  • Entry / Exit Pages

Segments For Specific Pages

Three page attributes will help you identify pages within your segment conditions. With examples from the Insightech homepage (I.e. https://www.insightech.com/), here are the three attributes:

  1. Hostname - This is the website domain including any subdomain variations that may exist.
  2. Page URL - This is the full URL that is present in your browser’s address bar when the page is loaded.
  3. Pathname - This is the URL path of the content, that comes after any hostname in a URL. For the homepage this is simply a forward slash “ / ”.

Click Behaviour Segments - Creation Methods

One of the most common segment types you will use, will be user specific clicks and behaviours. There are 2 main methods to create segments for on-page user behaviours.

Method 1 (Easiest method) - Interacting with Elements Within Session Replay

Within any session replay, clicking on elements from inspect mode, click map view, scrolling heatmap view, or form analysis views, will prompt you with a list of options of segments you can create.

Alternatively you can click on for the event or attribute in the events list

This is the easiest method to create a segment. Want something more customised? See method 2 below.

Method 2 - Segment Builder

Segments can be built through the segment builder.

  1. Click on Segmentation in the left nav menu
  1. Click on "New Segment" to be taken to the segment builder interface. You can also save segments directly from any filter applied in session replay listings pages.

You will then be taken to the segment builder page as displayed below.

Click Behaviour Segments - Types of Segments

1. Clicks on element attributes

Includes

  • Element text
  • Element links
  • Element IDs
  • Element names
  • Element paths

Click Event Types

Description

Click

When wanting to segment on click timings, within certain times of pageload. E.g. clicks within 10 seconds

Click : Element Text

Clicks on elements with specific text. This can be useful when wanting to segment for multiple buttons with the same text

Click : Link URL

Clicks on elements with specific links. This can be useful when wanting to segment for multiple buttons with the same destination URL

Click : Element ID

Clicks on elements with HTML ID. This can be useful when wanting to segment for multiple buttons with specific HTML ID

Click : Element Name

Clicks on elements with HTML element name. This can be useful when wanting to segment for multiple buttons with specific element names

Click : Element Path

Clicks on element path. This is useful when no element ID or element name is specified. It is recommended that this be done through interactive session replay mode, rather than segment builder, as it is much easier and the path will be automatically identified for you.

2. Last clicks on element attributes

Includes

  • Element text
  • Element URL links
  • Element IDs
  • Element names
  • Element paths

Last Click Event Types

Description

Last Clicked Element Text

Last clicks on page elements with specific text. This can be useful when wanting to segment for multiple buttons with the same text

Last Clicked Link URL

Last clicks on page elements with specific links. This can be useful when wanting to segment for multiple buttons with the same destination URL

Last Clicked Element ID

Last clicks on page elements with HTML ID. This can be useful when wanting to segment for multiple buttons with specific HTML ID

Last Clicked Element Name

Last clicks on page elements with HTML element name. This can be useful when wanting to segment for multiple buttons with specific element names

Last Clicked Element Path

Last clicks on page element path. This is useful when no element ID or element name is specified. It is recommended that this be done through interactive session replay mode, rather than segment builder, as it is much easier and the path will be automatically identified for you.

3. Last Clicks on input fields

Includes

  • Element text
  • Element IDs
  • Element names
  • Element paths

Last Click Input Field Event Type

Description

Last Clicked Field Text

Last clicks on form fields with specific text. This can be useful when wanting to segment for multiple fields, or fields across multiple forms that share the same text

Last Clicked Field ID

Last clicks on form fields with field ID. This can be useful when wanting to segment for multiple fields, or fields across multiple forms that share the same field ID

Last Clicked Field Name

Last clicks on form fields with field name. This can be useful when wanting to segment for multiple fields, or fields across multiple forms that share the same field name

Last Clicked Field Path

Last clicks on form field path. This is useful when no field ID or field name is available. It is recommended that this be done through interactive session replay mode, rather than segment builder, as it is much easier and the path will be automatically identified for you.

Click Event Examples

Example 1 - Multiple Buttons with Same Text

In the case when you have multiple buttons across your website with the same text (E.g. “Book a Demo” or “Contact Us”) that you want to track, here is an example segment below that you could use.

Example 2 - Multiple Buttons with Same Link Destination

In the case when you have multiple buttons linking to the same destination, you should use a “Click : Link URL” condition. Here is an example segment below that you could use.

Example 3 - Users Who Abandon A Form After Interacting With Field

If users are abandoning your form after a particular form field, and you want to explore what they do before or after this occurs, here is an example segment that will allow you to do this.

Example 4 - Users Who Abandon Page After Interacting With Element

If you identify that users are interacting with a particular element (E.g. a “More Info” button) before abandoning your funnel or a specific page, you can create a segment to monitor this behaviour.

Segments For HTML, Loaded Content, Dynamic Content/Pop-ups, and AB Tests

Sometimes you may want to understand how users interact when a piece of content is loaded on a page, or dynamically shown after an event.

Examples:
  • Error Messages
  • Out of stock messages
  • Form Validation Error Messages
  • Pop-up messages
  • Chat pop-up windows

In these cases, you will want to leverage either Load DOM: HTML Code, or DOM Change : Inject HTML Code to build your segment.

Event Type

Description

Load  DOM: HTML Code

Used for content that is embedded within, and loaded with the page itself. E.g. A homepage button or banner.

DOM Change : Inject HTML Code

Used for content that is not embedded within the page, and is shown separately to the page load. Typically these pieces of content are triggered by an event. E.g. Form input error message, out of stock message, product quick view (pop-up).

How to find the HTML for your Loaded/Dynamic Content

  1. Right click on the element you want to include in your segment
  2. Click on Inspect to bring up your console, displaying your website HTML
  3. Your HTML will be shown in your console, and your element will be highlighted.
  1. To confirm that the code is correct, hover your mouse over the line of HTML in the code, and the element you right clicked on should now be highlighted with additional details.

  1. Put your HTML in your segment or filter when you are done. Remember to use a Load Dom : HTML Code filter if the content is loaded on page load, and a DOM Change : Inject HTML Code filter if the content is dynamic and injected into the page after the page has loaded.

Segments For Funnel Stage Abandonment

Funnel stage segments can be a combination of page based or click behaviour based segments.

For the funnel stage abandonment, the key difference is that you will include one step in the funnel, and exclude the subsequent step in your segment. This segment will look at any user who doesn't progress to the subsequent step.

Here is an example of a checkout funnel stage segment:

In this example, we are looking at all users who within their session, visit the /checkout page but who do not visit the /checkout/success page.

Once we have this segment, we can begin looking at what other pages these users look at and what campaigns/channels they most commonly use. This will allow us to begin understanding what blockers or other information is required to get these users to progress in the funnel.

Segments For Source/Medium/Campaigns

To better understand inbound traffic types, and their influence on website behaviours, segments can be created leveraging any of the traffic attributes seen below.

Traffic Attribute

Description

Source

The original source of your website traffic (E.g. Google)

Medium

The channel type your traffic uses to reach your website

(E.g. cpc / organic / referral)

Campaign

The campaign used to reach your website. This is usually obtained through a utm_campaign parameter, or other campaign parameters where specified. This won’t always be available.

Search Terms

The paid search term used to reach your website. This is usually obtained through a parameter, similar to campaigns. This won’t always be available.

Content

The paid search term used to reach your website. This is usually obtained through a parameter, similar to campaigns. This won’t always be available.

Here is an example segment for a Google CPC campaign called “yourcampaign”:

Segments For Viewed Content (Scrolled to On-Page)

Sometimes you will want to understand if when users view specific messaging or content on your website, whether this influences their likelihood to convert.

To understand this, it is best to leverage the scrolling heatmap reports and to create segments directly from there.

In this situation you may want to create 2 segments for comparison:

  1. Users who don’t scroll and see your content

    Click on your scrolling heatmap just before the content you want to analyse. This will bring up a prompt to create a segment, and will include all users who DON'T see the content you want to analyse.
  2. Users who scroll and see your content

    Click on your scrolling heatmap just after the content you want to analyse. This will bring up a prompt to create a segment, and will include all users who DO see the content you want to analyse.

Comparing these 2 segments will show you whether viewing particular messaging or content influences form completions, and other behaviours across your website.

Segments For Entry or Exit Pages

Sometimes you will want to understand what users do when they enter via a specific landing page, or if they exit your website from a specific page like a funnel stage, or the checkout page.

In these situations, we would use entry page or exit page segments as shown below.

Attribute

Description

Entry Page

The first page your user lands on when arriving at your website

Exit Page

The final page your user views before leaving your website

Here is an example of entry page segment conditions for a URL containing “/yourlandingpage”:


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